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Sent: 23-03-2010 09:58:08
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Emerging Market AllocationsA How To Book Of Self Managed Super FundsBrain Rules 5The Easiest way to do a Client NewsletterThe Solution is WithinWhy Warren Buffett won't buy a NewspaperFour Topics This WeekEmail Marketing Business Opportunity - Helen Bairstow
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Brain Rules 5

Click here to buy - A How To Book of SMSF's by Tony Negline
Lester Wills

This continues my series on the 12 Brain Rules produced by Dr. John Medina, a developmental molecular biologist and research consultant: I have so far outlined the first 6 rules, more are outlined here:

7. "Sleep" - Snooze or Lose

The brain is in a constant state of tension between cells and chemicals that try to put you to sleep and cells and chemicals that try to keep you awake. The neurons of your brain show vigorous rhythmical activity when you're asleep, perhaps replaying what you learned that day. People vary in how much sleep they need and when they prefer to get it, but the biological drive for an afternoon nap is universal.

The human body increasingly malfunctions when deprived of sleep. If you are sleepless for a few days, in addition to severe fatigue, you will experience stomach upsets, crankiness, poor memory recall, disorientation, and eventually paranoia and hallucinations. For about 80% of the time you spend asleep, your brain doesn't really rest. Brain scans show enormous electrical activity among the neurons, even more than when you are awake. The body has a delicate control process, called the circadian cycle, which keeps you alternating between wakefulness and sleep periods. An individual's preferred sleep timeframe varies genetically. Early birds (of which I am one) make up about 10% of the population; another 20% of people are late nighters. The rest fall somewhere in between.

Loss of sleep hurts attention, executive function, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning, and even motor dexterity. Your brain slows in the afternoon, but a nap can work wonders (explains why the Spanish and Italians love the 'siesta'). Napping for 45 minutes will turbo-charge your brain for six hours. Conversely, students who skip even an hour of sleep each night face a dramatic drop in academic performance. Sleep deprivation impairs "attention, executive function, immediate memory, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning ability, general math knowledge."

Tips:

8. "Stress" - Chronic Tension Makes It Harder to Learn

A little bit of stress heightens your ability to learn, but ongoing, chronic stress damages brain

function. Chronic stress can cause a phenomenon called "learned helplessness," in which

people simply give up hope and no longer engage their brains or try to solve problems.

Your body's defense system, the release of adrenaline and cortisol, is built for an immediate response to a serious but passing danger. Chronic stress, such as hostility at home, dangerously deregulates a system built only to deal with short-term responses.

Under chronic stress, adrenaline creates scars in your blood vessels that can cause a heart attack or stroke, and cortisol damages the cells of the hippocampus, crippling your ability to learn and remember. Individually, the worst kind of stress is the feeling that you have no control over the problem, you are helpless.

During times of stress, people experience a "fight or flight response." The resulting blood pressure rise and racing pulse are detrimental over the long term, raising the risk of strokes and heart attacks. Chronic stress worsens your ability to work with numbers and language. When you are seriously stressed, you don't learn as well and have difficulty concentrating, remembering and solving problems.

Tips:

More next time


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