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Sent: 09-03-2010 09:58:06
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Rewarded for SuccessA How To Book Of Self Managed Super FundsBrain Rules part 3The Easiest way to do a Client NewsletterReally big decisions need timeWhy Warren Buffett won't buy a NewspaperWhy is the Henry Tax Review release delayedEmail Marketing Business Opportunity - Helen Bairstow
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Brain Rules part 3

Click here to buy - A How To Book of SMSF's by Tony Negline
Lester Wills

This continues my series on the 12 Brain Rules produced by Dr. John Medina, a developmental molecular biologist and research consultant: Last time I outlined the first 2 rules, more are outlined here:

3. "Wiring" - Brains Are "Wired" Individually

The brain's neural connections are in constant flux. Your specific brain structure depends on your culture and other external inputs. A musician' brain has different cellular "wiring" than a scuba diver's. Key brain growth occurs up until the early 20s and changes can continue for decades. Many researchers have worked to understand intelligence and to map how the brain functions. Some believe there are multiple types of IQ. One person might be great at math while another excels at physical movement. Different parts of the brain are activated for different memories and skills, so your brain scan looks different than anyone else's, even your twin's.

The brain's attentional "spotlight" can focus on only one thing at a time: no multitasking.

We are better at seeing patterns and abstracting the meaning of an event than we are at recording detail. Emotional arousal helps the brain learn.

Tips:

4. "Attention" - If It's Not Intriguing, Your Brain Isn't Interested

When you find something boring, you don't pay close attention and you can't retain the content - so when you're giving a presentation, capture the audience's interest as soon as you can. You want your audience to focus. Multitasking is a recipe for inefficiency and danger. In fact, multi-taskers are prone to 50% more errors and take 50% longer to finish a task than people who do one thing at a time. Studies say that chatting on your cell phone while you're behind the wheel of an automobile is as dangerous as driving under the influence of alcohol.

People remember emotional situations longer than calm ones for neurochemical reasons. During emotional events, your brain releases a neurotransmitter called dopamine, which is associated with attention and rewards; it helps you cement the memories. At stressful moments, the brain doesn't pick up details. It focuses on the big picture. If you're trying to teach someone, present "the key ideas and, in a hierarchical fashion, form the details around these larger notions." Provide information in 10-minute chunks and use entertaining hooks between those chunks.

Tips:

More next time.


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